The Early Years

While people are now becoming more and more aware of Billy Meier’s amazing story, it’s primarily been centered on his physical evidence, i.e. the UFO photos, films, video, sound recordings, metal alloy samples and seven-fingered hand prints, and the impeccably accurate prophetic information.

But there’s even more to this remarkable man’s story. Meier claims that when he was only ten years old, Sfath (his first Plejaren contactee) took him for a one-time visit to meet Gandhi. Later, during the 1950s and 1960s, Meier traveled extensively throughout Europe, Africa, India, Asia and the Middle East, not only joining and studying most of the major religions but also meeting many people who were, or would become, major players on the world’s stage.

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Meier in Paris at age 25

 

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Meier in Jordan, in 1963, when he was known as “Phantom”.

 

Meier had been encouraged in both these tasks by his extraterrestrial mentors, who saw them as being very important educational experiences that would contribute greatly to the overall scope of his mission as it unfolded over the years. In the course of these travels through 43 countries, he covered 155,000 miles, on foot and did hundreds of different jobs.

Among the many people that Meier met were King Hussein, Indira Gandhi, King Farouk, Nasser, Ayub Khan, Hailie Selassie, Franco, Tito, Nehru, Radjiv Ghandi, Radhakrishnan and…Saddam Hussein.

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Meier with two of King Hussein’s palace guards.

 

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Meier in Pakistan, in 1964, sporting the kind of outfit that would earn him the nickname “Billy”, given to him by American woman who was reminded of some of the characters of America’s old wild west, such as “Billy the Kid”.

 

As one delves deeper into Meier’s history, a unique picture emerges of a wanderer and adventurer of unparalleled dimension and experience, a kind of Indiana Jones meets Star Wars with a little Zelig thrown in. In addition to the deserved awe and appreciation one might have regarding Meier’s dangerous and courageous life, one has to laugh out loud at the puny skeptics and debunkers, comfortably ensconced in their armchairs and trying to reduce and contain the enormous importance of the man’s experiences, evidence and accomplishments to the minute and pathetically petty levels of their small and envious minds.

 

Original article on They Fly


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